Finding Dory

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Finding Dory - BD Combo Pack (2BD + DVD + Digital HD) [Blu-ray]

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Finding Dory (Plus Bonus Content)

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Finding Dory (Theatrical Version)

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Finding Dory/ Finding Nemo Double Pack [Blu-ray] [Region Free] [UK Import]

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Directed by Andrew Stanton (Finding Nemo, WALL-E) and Angus McLane (Burn-E) from a screenplay by Stanton and Victoria Strouse (October Road), Finding Dory is a rarity among sequels – it’s at least as good as its predecessor and it tells a story that’s actually worth making a feature-length movie to tell it. It’s sweetly sentimental and yet amazingly well written, a story where every detail has been thought through and serves a purpose in the telling of the story.

Finding Dory begins what seems like a short time after the end of Finding Nemo. Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), the regal tang who suffers from short-term memory loss, now lives in the same aquatic community as clownfish Marlin (Albert Brooks) and his young son Nemo (this time voiced by Hayden Rolence). While helping (or at least trying to) Nemo’s fish-school class, Dory suddenly remembers that she has a family, from whom she apparently became separated from when she was very, very young, younger even than Nemo. Realizing this, Dory becomes determined to find them, even though all she has to go on are a handful of hazy memories that she can barely hang on to.

Concerned about her inability to remember things, Marlin and Nemo accompany Dory to make sure nothing happens to her. There is, of course, trouble along the way, but as in any Disney film, she ends up getting a lot of unexpected help from a variety of sources that most notably include a cantankerous octopus named Hank (Ed O’Neill) who’s missing a tentacle, a near-sighted whale shark named Destiny (Kaitlin Olson) and an insecure beluga whale named Bailey (Ty Burrell) who’s lost the ability to echolocate.

As you can probably guess, dealing with disabilities is a recurring theme in Finding Dory, reminding us in a number of subtle ways that just because someone can’t do everything doesn’t mean that they can’t do anything.

What particularly impressed me after the movie was done was how well written it was. Nothing is wasted and every detail that’s introduced ends up mattering in some way, whether it’s a current trait of Dory’s that we discover ends up having roots in her past or something learned in an earlier scene ends up being used as the film hurtles towards its climax. It’s all so neatly tied together and flows so seamlessly that you can tell that the writers put an enormous amount of time and care into the screenplay to get everything just right.

Another thing that came to me after the film was over was that the title – Finding Dory – is not what people initially think. It’s not about Marlin and Nemo trying to find Dory this time around. It’s about Dory trying to find herself – her family, her past, and all of the little things she’s forgotten but which nonetheless shaped her into who and what she is.

Highly, highly recommended for anyone who likes dazzling animation combined with memorable characters in an extremely well-written story.

8 Total Score
Finding Dory

A Journey Over Waters Not to be Easily Forgotten. Fantastic movie

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